The World’s Fair | A History

The World’s Fair is a large public exhibition embedded in rich cultural tradition.  Originating in Paris with the industrial revolution, these grand expositions soon spread to continental Europe and the United Kingdom before making their mark across the world.  The grandfather fair, reverently referred to as the “Great Exhibition” was Prince Albert’s proposal to model regionally manufactured products in order to induce international trade and relations, buoy tourism and propagate art and design education.  The structure and ideology of this 1851 fair offered a clear precedent for the World’s Fair and it has continued to attract millions world-wide today.  The 2015 World’s Fair is being held in Milan, Italy.

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While culture sharing has always been and remains vital, the development of the World’s Fair can be distinguished in three Eras of characteristic evolution: Industrialization, Cultural Exchange and Nation Branding.

The Industrial Era, which lasted roughly from 1800 to 1938 focused heavily on trade and boasted technological inventions and industrial design in a rapidly advancing technological world.  Modern technologies were brought together from all over the world marking momentous occasions in historical information sharing.  Expositions such as the Philadelphia 1876 Centennial Exhibition with the debut of Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone and Chicago 1893 Fair presenting the early dishwasher became landmarks of advancement, procuring a progressive image of the World’s Fair.

During the Era of Cultural Exchange, beginning with New York’s 1939 World Fair, themed “Building a Better Tomorrow”, expositions took on diverging cultural themes, anticipating a bright future.  The focus of fairs became less about specific technologies and more about intercultural communication for the exchange and growth of innovation.  As cultural recognition and societal strength became of greater importance, the Era of Nation Branding began.

Countries began to use the World’s Fair as a platform to strengthen their national images through branding and architecture.  Great pavilions were erected and stand today as representations of great nations such as Japan, Canada, Finland and Spain.  Stunning architecture and nation branding required solid financial investment and thus, several nations shied away from hosting Expositions, fearing that the cost would outweigh the benefits.  The 2000 Dutch Exposition pavilion cost an approximate €35 million, but is thought to have brought in €350 million in turn for a thriving Dutch economy.

The World’s Fair has seen much evolution over the course of two hundred years and today embodies the characteristic of all three Eras.  Each fair presents the newest technologies including art and architecture while fostering cultural networking and bolstering a reputably positive national image. One of the few lasting, globally impacting traditions of our Earth, the World’s Fair is a magnificent opportunity for individuals, communities, cultures and societies to reach out as a part of an ever-evolving humanity.

The 1909 Seattle Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition

See the amazing, fantastic Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition through vintage postcards!

The Pacific Northwest has its own reasons to show off, and the 1909 Seattle Exposition gave the perfect opportunity. It’s mouthful of a name, so Alaska-Yukon-Pacific is often simply shortened to A-Y-P.

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The Secretary of the Arctic Brotherhood, Godfrey Chealander, pitched the idea for an Alaska exhibit in Seattle. Soon, the idea escalated into an exhibition pitch, piggy-backing off of the recent Lewis and Clark Exposition in Portland, Oregon.

In 1905, Seattle’s University of Washington had only three buildings surrounded by forest. Planners proposed to build the exposition on the campus, which would also do the university a favor.

Unlike many other world expositions, everything was ready by the fair’s June opening, with minimal scrambling to finish things at the last minute.

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Japanese and Canadian buildings supported the fair’s Pacific theme, and local buildings or symbols, like a model of a Washington state coal mine, stood as representations of the Northwest.

On “Seattle Day”, the fair had its highest attendance rate. Some called the exposition the “World’s Most Beautiful Fair.”

The fair was largely successful, but did have one major controversy. “Human Exhibits” were more popular back then, but the A-Y-P really took the cake: the fair set up a month-old orphan boy named Ernest as a raffle prize. However, no one came to claim him, and no records show what happened to him.

In the end, the A-Y-P was a big success. It didn’t even need financial assistance from the government, thanks to clever marketing and publicity.

Looking for vintage World Fair postcards? Look no further.