Collecting Linen Postcards

Linen postcards’ misleading name suggests postcards made out of fabric, but that is far from the case. They’re in fact made of paper: a textured, high quality paper.

What really makes linen postcards stand out is their saturated colors on top of the textured material. The card stock has a high rag content, meaning a higher content of cotton fiber and generally better quality. The embossed paper allows for quicker-drying ink, too.

Linen postcard were printed from the 1930’s to the 1950’s. Linen postcards usually had white borders, a carry-over from postcards between WWI and the 1920’s.

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Curt Teich Co. of Chicago printed the most linen postcards. Each postcard was numbered, making them easy to distinguish from each other and be carefully collected based on the number. Curt Teich also produced the famous “large letter” linen postcards, those cards popular among tourists and fans of the shining pinnacle of road trip-era America.

The categories of linen postcards vary; popular categories include scenics, comics, and travel postcards.

Do you collect linen postcards? As you can see, they’re easy to distinguish from other types of postcards. Let us know if you collect them, and what topics you like to collect, in the comments!

Looking for some more linen postcards of your own? Check no further than our ebay store!

Large Letter “Greetings From” Postcards

The linen postcard era saw one particularly popular design. Made for travelers to brag about the destinations they made it to on long summer road trips in America, large letter postcards showed the biggest, flashiest, most fun side of any city.

These large letter postcards, now often associated with the 1930’s through 1950’s eras that the postcards were most popular in, had their time in the spotlight in the U.S. They usually started with the words “Greetings From,” followed by large letters or numbers with pictures of the city inside. These cards had bright, saturated colors as a result of the new kinds of inks on the market at the time. They also had a soft focus; the uneven surfaces of linen postcards did not lend themselves to sharp edges. All of this added to a bright, romanticized view of whatever destination the postcard advertised.

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These postcards are quite popular among collectors. Some collect them form their own state, or try to collect one from every state.

Today, any sort of large letter image invokes an image of vintage, roadside America. It’s part of their retro charm that makes large letter design so easily recognizable.

Do you collect large letter postcards? Which ones are your favorites?

Want some large letter postcards of your own? You can go here.