Edmund Dulac

Edmund Dulac was a French-British magazine illustrator, book illustrator and stamp designer. Born in Toulouse he studied law but later turned to the study of art at the École des Beaux-Arts. He moved to London in the early 20th century and in 1905 received his first commission which was to illustrate the novels of the Brontë Sisters. During World War I, Dulac produced relief books and when after the war he turned to mainly magazine illustrations. He designed banknotes during World War II and postage stamps, most notably, during the beginning of Queen Elizabeth II’s reign.

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“She had read all the newspapers” from “The Snow Queen” London, Hodder & Stoughton, Ltd., 1911

At 22 Dulac was commissioned by the publisher J. M. Dent to illustrate Jane Eyre and nine other volumes of works by the Brontë sisters. He then became a regular contributor to The Pall Mall Magazine, and joined the London Sketch Club, which introduced him to the book and magazine illustrators of the day. Through these connections he began an association with the Leicester Galleries and Hodder & Stoughton. The gallery commissioned illustrations from Dulac which they sold in an annual exhibition, while publishing rights to the paintings were taken up by Hodder & Stoughton for reproduction in illustrated gift books. Books produced under this arrangement by Dulac include Stories from The Arabian Nights (1907) with 50 colour images; an edition of William Shakespeare’s The Tempest (1908) with 40 colour illustrations; The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam (1909) with 20 colour images; The Sleeping Beauty and Other Fairy Tales (1910); Stories from Hans Christian Andersen (1911); The Bells and Other Poems by Edgar Allan Poe (1912) with 28 colour images and many monotone illustrations; and Princess Badoura (1913).

During World War I he contributed to relief books, including King Albert’s Book (1914), Princess Mary’s Gift Book, and, his own Edmund Dulac’s Picture-Book for the French Red Cross (1915) including 20 colour images. Hodder and Stoughton also published The Dreamer of Dreams (1915) including 6 colour images – a work composed by the then Queen of Romania.

 

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1910 Shakespeare’s Comedy of The Tempest Illustrated by Edmund Dulac

After the war, the deluxe edition illustrated books became a rarity and Dulac’s career in this field was over. His last such books were Edmund Dulac’s Fairy Book (1916), the Tanglewood Tales (1918)  and The Kingdom of the Pearl (1920). His career continued in other areas, including newspaper caricatures (especially at The Outlook), portraiture, theatre costume and set design, bookplates, chocolate boxes, medals, and various graphics (especially for The Mercury Theatre, Notting Hill Gate).

He also produced illustrations for The American Weekly, a Sunday newspaper chain in America and Britain’s Country Life. Country Life Limited (London) published Gods and Mortals in Love (1935) (including 9 colour images) based on a number of the contributions made by Dulac to Country Life previously. The Daughter of the Stars (1939) was a further publication to benefit from Dulac’s artwork – due to constraints related to the outbreak of World War II, that title included just 2 colour images. He continued to produce books for the rest of his life, more so than any of his contemporaries, although these were less frequent and less lavish than during the Golden Age.

Dulac also designed postage stamps for Great Britain, including the postage stamp issued to commemorate the Coronation of King George VI that was issued on 13 May 1937. The head of the King used on all the stamps of that reign was his design and he also designed the 2s 6d and 5s values for the ‘arms series’ high values. As well he contributed designs for the sets of stamps issued to commemorate the 1948 Summer Olympics and the Festival of Britain.

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Dulac Designed 1953 Coronation Stamp

 

Dulac was one of the designers of the Wilding series stamps, which were the first definitive stamps of the reign of Queen Elizabeth II. He was responsible for the frame around the image of the Queen on the 1s, 1s 3d and 1s 6d values. His image of the Queen was rejected in favor of a photographic portrait by Dorothy Wilding to which he carried out some modifications by hand. He also designed the 1s 3d value stamp of the set issued to commemorate the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II but he passed just before it was issued.

Dulac designed stamps (Marianne de Londres series) and banknotes for Free France during World War II. In the early 1940s Dulac also prepared a project for a Polish 20-zlotych note for the Bank of Poland (Bank Polski). This banknote (printed in England in 1942 but dated 1939) was ordered by the Polish Government in Exile and was never issued.

Halfway through his final book commission (Milton’s Comus), Dulac passed away of a heart attack on 25 May 1953 in London. He is forever remembered as a prominent illustrator of the 20th century.


If you’d like a 1910 copy of The Tempest illustrated by Edmund Dulac check out our Ebay Store

Pioneers of Color Printing: The McLoughlin Bros., Inc.

The McLoughlin Bros., formed in 1828 in New York, made revolutionary moves in regards to color printing technologies. They printed many children’s books with this newer color method.

They specialized in retelling classic stories, often removing any material that they considered improper or offensive.

The company grew as a family business, first run by John McLoughlin, Jr. and soon joined by his younger brother Edmund McLoughlin as a business partner.

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At the start of the business, they continually experimented with methods of illustration and their printing process. They tried hand stenciling to zinc etching to chromolithography, a method for making multi-color prints.

Eventually they opened a color printing factory which employed up to 75 artists. The company had established chromolithographs as their printing method of choice. The company moved their office location in New York a number of times through the years.

Inside pages of illustration from "The Old Woman and Her Pig" by McLoughlin Bros., Inc.

Inside pages of illustration from “The Old Woman and Her Pig

Unfortunately, the company founder John McLoughlin Jr.’s death in 1905 brought hardship to the company. It sorely missed his business and artistic leadership.

In 1920, Milton Bradley bought McLoughlin Bros., Inc. The McLoughlin branch still continued production of books and games (minus a pause in production during the WWII years). Through the years, other companies bought the McLoughlin trademark. The company’s name finally dropped from print in the 1970s.

Today, collectors express plenty of interest towards McLoughlin Bros. books and games as well as the Mcloughlin wood engraving blocks. They’re hot commodities in the collecting world.

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Source: American Antiquarian

Kate Greenaway, Famous Children’s Book Illustrator

Kate Greenaway (1846-1901) illustrated and wrote children’s books in the 19th century. Among Randolph Caldecott and Walter Crane, she’s considered one of the best illustrators of her time.

Greenaway’s parents encouraged her artistic interests and she had won a number of awards by age seventeen, thus cementing her successful future career.

Greenaway illustrated over 30 books. Most of her illustrations include happy boys and girls dressed in Regency and late eighteenth century fashions, out enjoying themselves in nature. Their clothes, though inspired by those eras, were all Greenaway’s own designs. They gained popularity even among fashion circles for their charming nostalgia. The company Liberty of London even used Greenaway’s designs as inspiration for actual clothes.

Polly by Kate Greenaway

“Polly”

During her career, Greenaway’s fan base extended far beyond her home country of England, including a large fan base in America.

She even got a medal named for her. In 1955 the Kate Greenaway Medal was established for exceptional illustrations in children’s books – not to be confused with the Caldecott Medal, which honors children’s picture books as a whole.

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This particular book by Greenaway, titled Ring-Round-A-Rosy, is done in the typical style of Greenaway’s, showing cheerful children playing and enjoying nature. The book’s publisher is The Saalfield Publishing Company, and this edition is a part of their rare muslin books, built to last through the wear and tear of young readers.

Many of the books that Greenaway illustrated were perfect for young readers, but their timelessness appeals to adults as well, and her illustrations still charm today.

The Illustrations of Edmund Dulac

Edmund Dulac changed the art world as we know it.

A select few illustrators make up what we now refer to as the “golden age of illustration”, a time period between 1880s-1920s of superb book, magazine, and newspaper illustrations. Illustrated books became a favorite media at the time, leading to long-living, valued illustrations that are still favorites today. We’ve written about Arthur Rackham, but the other illustrators also deserve recognition.

Another such illustrator from the golden age was Edmund Dulac, a French artist.

Although Dulac started his studies in law, he quickly became bored and switched to studying art full-time. This seems like a good idea in retrospect, considering he was able to get his first commission at the young age of 22, for 60 illustrations in an edition of Jane Eyre. Dulac soon moved to London to continue his career.

The Princess and the Pea (Via super freeparking on Flickr)

The Princess and the Pea (Via super freeparking on Flickr)

The company Hodder & Stoughton purchased the rights to his paintings, which they used in their illustrated books. These books were published once a year.

Dulac’s favorite subjects to illustrate were fantasy and fiction elements from classic stories. He illustrated such stories as Stories from The Arabian Nights, The Tempest by William Shakespeare, The Sleeping Beauty and Other Fairy Tales, Stories from Hans Christian Anderson, and The Bells and Other Poems by Edgar Allan Poe.

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Shakespeare’s Comedy of The Tempest, illustrated by Dulac and available here in a rare edition.

Dulac strayed away from the more popular colored ink drawings at the time (a technique used most notably by Arthur Rackham). Instead, he used his preference for painting to let color define the subject. The new printing presses at the time were conveniently ready just in time to accommodate the color separation.

Dulac’s technique changed in the mid-1910s, when his illustrations went from romantic, subdued colors into more oriental styles.

Illustration for Quatrain LXXII of the Rubaiyat (Via super freeparking on Flickr)

Illustration for Quatrain LXXII of the Rubaiyat (Via super freeparking on Flickr)

The golden age of illustration came to an end after the first World War. People were no longer entranced by these illustrated books. Dulac had no choice but to move on to other subjects.

And move on he did, going on to work on such things as newspaper caricatures, portraits, theater design, bookplates, and much more.

He also designed postage stamps for Great Britain, including contributions to the first stamps of the reign of Queen Elizabeth II.

Book editions with Dulac’s work can still be found today, and they have aged well, still acting as timeless examples of illustration’s golden age.

Sources:

Illustrators

Wikipedia

An Artist Everybody Should Know About: Arthur Rackham

Looking for a way to instantly bring yourself back to childhood? How about a dose of Arthur Rackham?

Rackham was an English artist who illustrated books in the late 19th and early 20th century, taking advantage of the market for quality illustrated books at the time. You’ve seen him around. In postcards and calendars, coffee table books and greeting cards, Rackham’s art thrills fantasy lovers and art collectors alike. But why is it that Arthur Rackham, born in 1867, still excites the imagination to this day? Consider his mythological and folkloric inspiration.

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The Twa Corbies

With fairies, goblins, and elves, along with a masterful sense of movement and Germanic art style, a sense of wonder truly pours from his art. Sometimes his darker, gloomier tones illustrate the more mysterious sides of stories with gnarled, twisted trees or wizened faces.

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Young Beichan

Rackham’s style molded our modern interpretation of the Victorian aesthetic, when children were beginning to be recognized not as little adults but as people who still needed room to grow. Rackham started his work by sketching a drawing outline, putting in details, then going over the lines with India ink. He added color through multiple watercolor washes for translucent colors, although it has been suggested that color was a challenge for him, considering his insistence on subdued tones.

Rackham’s art was the perfect partner of the fanciful children’s books released at the time: Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens, The Wind in the Willows, Alice in Wonderland, Hans Christian Andersen’s Tales, Aesop’s Fables and many more. His illustrations for A Midsummer Night’s Dream are considered one of his masterpieces.

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A Midsummer Night’s Dream

He also inspired many artists today, including director Guillermo del Toro, who cited Rackham’s art as inspiration for his film Pan’s Labyrinth. These days you can find his art on cards, postcards and calendars or, if you’re lucky, his illustrations in an original edition.

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Text decoration from A Midsummer Night’s Dream

What’s your favorite Arthur Rackham illustration?