Bet You Didn’t Know The Origin of Basketball

On one fateful day in 1891, Dr. James Naismith needed a way to keep his students busy indoors during the cold winters. He came up with the rules for an indoor game played with a soccer ball and a peach basket nailed onto the wall. The number of people on each team was determined by the number of students in Naismith’s gym class. The game eventually evolved into basketball, the only major sport invented in the U.S.

Basketball rules evolved over time. When the game first started, the basket had a bottom and the ball had to be removed manually each time. The original game had no dribbling, either; dribbling was only introduced in the 1950’s when the ball had become a more uniform sphere.

Naismith claimed that he based the rules of basketball on the children’s game “Duck on a Rock”.

$_57

You can buy this postcard here!

These are the original rules of basketball, penned by Dr. James Naismith himself (source):

1. The ball may be thrown in any direction with one or both hands.
2. The ball may be batted in any direction with one or both hands.
3. A player cannot run with the ball. The player must throw it from the spot on which he catches it, allowance to be made for a man who catches the ball when running at a good speed if he tries to stop.
4. The ball must be held in or between the hands; the arms or body must not be used for holding it.
5. No shouldering, holding, striking, pushing, or tripping in any way of an opponent. The first infringement of this rule by any person shall count as a foul; the second shall disqualify him until the next basket is made or, if there was evident intent to injure the person, for the whole of the game. No substitution shall be allowed.
6. A foul is striking at the ball with the fist, violation of rules three and four and such described in rule five.
7. If either side makes three consecutive fouls, it shall count a goal for the opponents (consecutive means without the opponents in the mean time making a foul).
8. A goal shall be made when the ball is thrown or batted from the grounds into the basket and stays there (without falling), providing those defending the goal do not touch or disturb the goal. If the ball rests on the edges, and the opponent moves the basket, it shall count as a goal.
9. When the ball goes out of bounds, it shall be thrown into the field of play and played by the first person touching it. In case of dispute the umpire shall throw it straight into the field. The thrower-in is allowed five seconds. If he holds it longer, it shall go to the opponent. If any side persists in delaying the game, the umpire shall call a foul on that side.
10. The umpire shall be the judge of the men and shall note the fouls and notify the referee when three consecutive fouls have been made. He shall have power to disqualify people according to Rule 5.
11. The referee shall be judge of the ball and shall decide when the ball is in play, in bounds, to which side it belongs, and shall keep the time. He shall decide when a goal has been made and keep account of the baskets, with any other duties that are usually performed by a scorekeeper.
12. The time shall be two fifteen-minute halves, with five minutes rest between.
13. The side making the most points in that time is declared the winner.

Lunchboxes, the Talk of the Playground (and Collectors)

Do you remember the days when your lunchbox as one of the most important things you carried to school? Tin lunchboxes used to be all the rage on the playground, featuring popular pop culture figures, often with matching Thermoses. How cool your lunchbox was would either side you with the cool kids or stick you in the “dork” category.

Now tin lunchboxes are all the rage with collectors.

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As with many things, a little mouse named Mickey got the ball rolling on character-approved lunchboxes. Mickey was featured on a metal “Lunch Kit” and soon other companies caught on.

Captain America lunchbox by Visitor7 on Wikimedia Commons, CC 3.0.

Captain America lunchbox by Visitor7 on Wikimedia Commons, CC 3.0.

 

In the mid-20th century, a company called Aladdin started the real lunchbox craze. They started printing pop culture-relevant designs on the boxes and dominated most of the market until the early 1960’s, around the time that the Thermos Company started decorating lunchboxes on all sides.

Around that time, Aladdin started making 3D lunchboxes, too, embossing designs on the metal boxes to make them stick out.

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By Visitor7 on Wikimedia Commons, CC 3.0

In the 60’s, space-themed boxes were especially popular, with imagery featuring The Jetsons and Star Trek. This is on top of all the other famous figures like the Beatles.

And in the ’70s and ’80s, lunchboxes really took over in the cafeteria. TV shows and film featured on the boxes as sneakier marketing. Hot Wheel boxes were pretty popular, too.

Pro tip: Original Hot Wheels lunchboxes with the Twin Mill car are especially rare.

The popularity of lunchboxes has, unfortunately, died down a bit. But plenty of vintage boxes are out there for collecting nostalgic pieces of the past.

Did you own any pop culture lunchboxes as a kid? Do you collect them now?